Global Career Blog

Best Countries For Your Global Job Search

Posted on Aug 15, 2017 | 0 comments

Best Countries For Your Global Job Search

With the global economy in a constant state of flux, many are looking toward the next phase of their career with uncertainty. the job market continues to pose challenges for those searching for better opportunities. For some, limited career options motivate them to emigrate to another country in search of work.  

 

Before you consider making such a move, it would behoove you to have some idea of which countries might offer you the best opportunity for employment. It’s vital that you avoid moving abroad spontaneously, only to realize that the locale where you’re seeking work has suffered greater job loss—particularly in your career field—than the one you left.  If you are looking for gainful employment somewhere in the world, here are a few countries that may present the opportunity to easily obtain work and earn.

 

Although wealthy nations with highly paid employees such as the United States, Canada, and most European countries would seem at first glance to provide the most job opportunities, they also boast fairly high unemployment rates.  The reasons for this strange phenomenon are multifold.  First, many of the lenders that went belly-up when the bubble burst on the housing market in 2008 saw their demise in these nations. Although some were saved with government bailouts, the repercussions still closed the doors of several lending institutions and caused cutbacks at others, leading to massive layoffs.  And then the trickle-down began, leading to layoffs in adjacent industries, which eventually led to cutbacks in just about every sector of the job market.  The result? 10-20% unemployment in some job sectors.

 

In addition, many companies that operate in these countries are still in need of employees to get the work done. Since they cannot afford the trained professionals in their own country, they have developed an unparalleled market for outsourcing, opening branches in developing countries and emerging markets where they can pay their outsourced employees a fraction of the salary that they would pay in their home country for the same work and a similar skill level, and still offer what is considered a comparable salary for the lower-income region.  

 

If you’re looking to follow your job to a foreign country, given the above information, there are still several countries that are likely to yield positive results.

 

India

 

The first country of note for job opportunities is India.  If you have a desire to live in a developing country steeped in a complex culture with a very high population of impoverished and underserved people, then this job market may be for you. Given that there are opportunities available in a wide variety of career areas, you might find an even better position than the one you left.  

 

One downside of working in India is that you will be paid significantly less than Western countries in comparison. But considering the lower cost of living, you may still come out ahead. Work permits may present your greatest challenge, so it may be best to secure employment before arriving in the country.

 

China

 

China is another growing market for professionals. Japan was previously at the forefront when it came to growth of industry, but in recent years, China has expanded its white-collar workforce astronomically. The biggest obstacle to working in China is ultimately diplomatic:  it is traditionally quite difficult to immigrate to the People’s Republic of China. You may want to consider trying the westernized port of Hong Kong for an easier career entry.

 

Europe

 

Europe also offers several growing job markets. Norway and Switzerland are still enjoying less than 5% unemployment rates. But if you already reside in a European country, moving from one EU economy to another may ultimately not prove fruitful in moving your career forward. If you want to follow the jobs that make an impact, you may ultimately have to leave your comfort zone. However, if you’re looking for work in a totally different job market, you can find it, and do quite well for yourself, by going to another country.

 

The bottom line: Before you hop on a plane, bound for a new career adventure, you will need to do your research to determine your best opportunities. Websites like Passport Career provide a plethora of resources available to help you in all aspects of your global job search.

 

Do you want to learn how to make your career move abroad?

 

Thank you for reading our Global Career Blog. We also offer dynamic, interactive trainings that provide insights on many different global career topics. Visit our brand new training site to register for upcoming courses.

 

Passport Career provides more detailed career information and extensive resources about networking, finding an international job or internship, country-specific business protocol and culture, alternative career opportunities, writing country-specific resumes/CVs, cover letters and interview strategies for other countries. If your university/college, organization, company, embassy, library, or other institution would like access to our country portfolios and global career training program (50,000+ pages of expert content for 90+ countries and 275+ cities) to share with your students, employees, spouses/partners, and others managing a national or international career transition, please click here to contact us (or send email to: global@passportcareer.com) regarding a free, live, online demo and details on how to obtain a license to access Passport Career.

 


 

This is a guest post from Sarah Danielson. Danielson writes for TripBase, a personalized travel website, which covers the range of transatlantic cruises to cheap hotels in Glasgow.

 

Tips and Tricks for Becoming Bilingual

Posted on Aug 8, 2017 | 0 comments

Tips and Tricks for Becoming Bilingual

If you are reading this article with relative ease, you are already fluent in one language. This being the case, you likely also have the tools necessary to acquire and become fluent in a second (or third, or fourth) language. Although the process of learning a new language is hardly as simple as recognizing your language learning potential, it is an important fact to keep in mind while navigating your way through the various language acquisition tools and aids available today.

 

Most formally educated adults have had some form of foreign language education in school. But while many are able to recall a small percentage of the grammar, syntax and vocabulary they studied in the foreign language classroom, most students fail to become functionally fluent solely through academic training. Some argue that there are obvious reasons for academia’s failure to output multilingual speakers. According to this theory, neither the pressure of a formal academic setting nor the decontextualized study of grammar allow for spontaneous and exploratory conversation. Others argue that the classroom is still ultimately the best setting for some types of language learners.

 

Regardless of where you learn best, the following are helpful tips and tricks for jump-starting or improving your language acquisition. Finding out which of these methods and tools work best for you will undoubtedly put you on the road to fluency in a new language.

 

Change your language learning perspective.

 

Individuals who argue against their ability to achieve fluency in another language often cite the fact that they are adults, and therefore no longer possess the aptitude or sponge-like brains they had during their younger years – a challenging situation to overcome. In fact, adults often display higher language acquisition ability because they have more experience learning languages, and because they often have a more sophisticated understanding of the context surrounding a word or sentence.

 

Another key change to consider is reversing the language learning process traditionally followed in academic settings. Rather than pouring over books and memorizing grammar rules, find a friend with a second language in common and dive into a conversation. Learning on the fly through successes and failures in real time will not only help you develop your listening skills, but will force you to rapidly produce the language, leading to quicker reaction times and more successes in the future, which in turn will stimulate faster learning.

 

Consider alternative language learning methods.

 

Technology has made several effective alternative language learning practice available to anyone with an internet connection:

  • Duolingo is a mobile phone application that allows for a short language lesson every day, and helps keep users consistent by both requiring review of already-learned concepts, and sending daily reminders to users to complete new lessons. Reminders can also be adjusted or turned off, if desired.
  • Skype-based foreign language conversation services, like Italki and Busuu, help pair partners interested in conversing in a common language. Simply choose which language who wish to speak, find a partner, and set a regular meeting time.
  • Language-learning podcasts such as the News in Slow… series, the Coffee Break series, and Actual Fluency, are free, excellent road-trip companions, constantly offering subscribers and listeners new lessons and challenges.  

 

Embrace failure.

 

No matter the level of pressure imposed by the language acquisition setting, new language learners are bound to make mistakes. These mistakes are a vital piece of the learning process, and should thus be recognized as beneficial, rather than detrimental. In failing, individuals learn the nuances of the language they are studying firsthand, and are therefore more easily able to hold themselves accountable in avoiding such a mistake in future conversation.

 

Practice really does make perfect.

 

In understanding the importance of regular second language practice, consider how long it has taken you to achieve your current level of fluency. Reaching the end of a class, finishing a podcast series, or completing a workbook in a particular language should not be the conclusion of your practice. Maintaining fluency requires just as much effort as obtaining it. If focusing solely on the language you want to speak is no longer difficult enough, enroll in an academic course in that language that covers more abstract concepts, such as economics or sociology, and read literature that will challenge your understanding in your new tongue.

 

No matter what kind of learner you are, consistency and dedication to practice are the most important pieces of the language acquisition puzzle. Set a goal for yourself, set a deadline, and enjoy the educational journey.

 

Do you want more information on becoming multilingual for a global career?

 

Thank you for reading our Global Career Blog. We also offer dynamic, interactive trainings that provide insights on many different global career topics. Visit our brand new training site to register for upcoming courses.

 

Passport Career provides more detailed career information and extensive resources about networking, finding an international job or internship, country-specific business protocol and culture, alternative career opportunities, writing country-specific resumes/CVs, cover letters and interview strategies for other countries. If your university/college, organization, company, embassy, library, or other institution would like access to our country portfolios and global career training program (50,000+ pages of expert content for 90+ countries and 275+ cities) to share with your students, employees, spouses/partners, and others managing a national or international career transition, please click here to contact us (or send email to: global@passportcareer.com) regarding a free, live, online demo and details on how to obtain a license to access Passport Career.

10 Must Have Apps for Business Travelers

Posted on Aug 1, 2017 | 0 comments

10 Must Have Apps for Business Travelers

Business traveling can be hectic and exhausting at times, but your smartphone can help make your trip a little bit easier. Just be sure to check with your carrier or, if you have a work phone, your employer, before using any of the below apps abroad, as they may incur additional charges.

 

Planning Your Trip

 

TripIt:  TripIt is a great tool for multi-city trips, or for those who aren’t great at keeping track of all of their flight and hotel bookings. TripIt collects all of your travel plans, itineraries, and hotel bookings in one easy-to-navigate place. The app is currently available for iOS, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone, as well as their associated tablets.

 

Gate Guru: Gate Guru provides real-time flight status updates, airport amenities maps, weather updates and a last minute rental car booking function. It is available for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone.

 

TripAdvisor:  A long-time mainstay for travelers, TripAdvisor offers a few different apps, including one that can help locate hotels and glights. Their biggest claim to fame is their Offline City Guide App, which allows you to carry around a free city guide on your smartphone. You can access restaurants, attractions, hotels, and reviews for pre-trip planning and during travel downtime. available for iOS and Android.

 

Once You’re There

 

XE Currency: XE Currency is a free currency converter that updates when you have data or wifi access and stores the most updated conversion rates for offline usage. You can store up to 10 currencies on the free version, which makes multi-country business trips a breeze!  This app is available for iOS, Android, Blackberry, and Windows Phone.

 

Hopstop: For those business travelers who prefer public transportation, Hopstop is a must-have. With up to the minute walking maps, bus, subway/metro, and train schedules for 600 cities in several languages, you may never be lost again! Available for iOS.

 

Evernote: for those who work on the go, Evernote is a great tool. Login on your smartphone, tablet, or computer and all of your notes, checklists and reminders will be synced across all of your devices. Use the web-clipper tool to save articles and websites for upcoming presentations or research on the go.vailable for iOS, Android, Blackberry, and Windows Phone.

 

Google Translate and Google Goggles: Google Translate has become ubiquitous, but with the company’s improved voice recognition, you can ask questions and have your phone or tablet translate them into the local language in an instant. Available for iOS, Android. Additionally,Google Goggles (Android only) allows you to take a picture of a sign, building, statue or landmark and run a Google search to discover its meaning, significance and history!

 

Staying in Touch

 

WhatsApp: WhatsApp is a great way to stay in touch with family, friends and colleagues while on the go. This messaging app allows you to send messages, pictures, audio notes and video messages from your smartphone using data or wifi, helping you  stay in touch without the roaming charges. WhatsApp is available for iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia S40, Symbian and Windows Phone.

 

Viber: Use Viber to send text messages, photos, video messages, or place phone calls using data or wifi to other Viber users anywhere in the world for free!  Plans for calling landlines and mobile phones are also available.  Available for iOS, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone, Bada, Nokia, and as a computer app.

 

Skype: Much like Viber, Skype can be used to make phone and video calls from smartphones using data or wifi, and can also be used to send instant messages to other Skype users  Different plans are also available for placing calls to landlines and mobile numbers. Skype is available for iPhone, Android, Nokia X, Blackberry, and Windows Phone.

 

There are thousands of travel apps out there. your favorite travel apps so we can share them with the Passport Career community!

 

Thank you for reading our Global Career Blog. We also offer dynamic, interactive trainings that provide insights on many different global career topics. Visit our brand new training site to register for upcoming courses. 

Passport Career provides more detailed career information and extensive resources about networking, finding an international job or internship, country-specific business protocol and culture, alternative career opportunities, writing country-specific resumes/CVs, cover letters and interview strategies for other countries. If your university/college, organization, company, embassy, library, or other institution would like access to our country portfolios and global career training program (50,000+ pages of expert content for 90+ countries and 275+ cities) to share with your students, employees, spouses/partners, and others managing a national or international career transition, please click here to contact us (or send email to: global@passportcareer.com) regarding a free, live, online demo and details on how to obtain a license to
access Passport Career.

 

Starting a Career in the United States for Non-US Citizens

Posted on Jul 27, 2017 | 0 comments

Each year, the number of international students and foreign-born professionals from all over the world who navigate the process of gaining employment in the United States grows. But even as the number of working non-US citizens increases, many expats hoping to gain work in the US may be overwhelmed by the complexities and challenges put before them, unsure of where to start. There are many different ways to begin the process of obtaining permanent employment in the US. The below examples are just several potential options:

 

Seek Out Seasonal Work

 

While permanent employment may be a challenge for both Americans and expats, seasonal work often offers more opportunities. Summer camps, ski resorts, outdoor amusement parks, and temporary festivals welcome applicants with flexible schedules and diverse perspectives that will enrich their permanent staff during the busy season. Because jobs offering short-term employment often advertise their open positions more widely, seasonal work is also fairly easy to find through a quick Google search, making the application process much simpler other types of work.

 

Make Yourself Indispensable

 

One of the easiest methods of gaining work in the United States is becoming a professional in a growing US career field. Specializing in a high-demand sector of work by becoming a sustainable energy technician, an occupational or physical therapist or tech, or a commercial diver, will make you invaluable to companies in need. The first step in making yourself a must-hire is to seek out and complete the training necessary to qualify.

 

Consider an Education in the US

 

If you determine in selecting a career field that you will need additional education, it may be an added advantage to complete your schooling in the United States. American companies are sometimes reluctant to hire expats from a country whose education system does not closely mirror theirs, even if the ending qualification is the same. Even if some of your education is completed abroad, exhibiting your ability to succeed within the US system of higher education will make you an even more valuable candidate.

 

Learn About the Visa Process

 

There are a limited number of US work visas given out to workers of certain professions, from certain countries, each year. These predetermined numbers add an element of chance and luck to the career-building process. Keep up to date on the most in-demand job skills and fastest growing professions, and don’t allow yourself to be easily discouraged – your work visa may be a low priority one year, and easily obtained at the beginning of the next year. Attending specialized, affordable trainings like those offered by Passport Career are extremely helpful in learning the ins and outs of the American work visa application and approval process.

 

Want to know more about starting your career abroad?

 

Thank you for reading our Global Career Blog. We also offer dynamic, interactive trainings that provide insights on many different global career topics. Visit our brand new training site to register for upcoming courses.

 

Passport Career provides more detailed career information and extensive resources about networking, finding an international job or internship, country-specific business protocol and culture, alternative career opportunities, writing country-specific resumes/CVs, cover letters and interview strategies for other countries. If your university/college, organization, company, embassy, library, or other institution would like access to our country portfolios and global career training program (50,000+ pages of expert content for 90+ countries and 275+ cities) to share with your students, employees, spouses/partners, and others managing a national or international career transition, please click here to contact us (or send email to: global@passportcareer.com) regarding a free, live, online demo and details on how to obtain a license to
access Passport Career.

 

Best Practices for Securing an International Business Job Overseas

Posted on Jul 25, 2017 | 0 comments

Best Practices for Securing an International Business Job Overseas

Increasingly, professionals and college graduates are finding that good-paying jobs can be hard to come by in the United States.  To better their odds, some are considering obtaining an international business degree and seeking employment in other countries. Likewise, international business students in countries like Canada and Australia are more likely to seek employment in the country in which they completed their studies, rather than their home country.

 

Working in another country is not a decision to be taken lightly, but can be immensely rewarding.  It is important to take the time to do some research and to make sure that working in your career field is a possibility in your chosen country.  Not all fields of study are in demand in all cultures, and not all countries require the same qualifications for certain careers.  

 

Plan Early

 

If you have decided that working in a foreign country is something you would like to do, it is best to start planning early.  It is highly recommended that you utilize easily accessible resources, such as informative online career webinars about work visas and international career blogs and sites, but you should plan to use the local resources in your new home country as well.

 

Below are several suggested steps, besides acquiring an international business degree, which can ease your transition into a new culture, and some that can make you a more attractive candidate to the companies hiring there.  

 

Research the Country  

 

First, you need to find out as much as possible about the country where you intend to work.  Studying there is always a benefit, but not always possible.  If you cannot study there, you should try to travel there, or at the very least speak to expats living there.  Always be open to the possibility of an internship, even if you have work experience.  Even if the pay is poor or non-existent, the experience will prove invaluable.  On the ground experience is the best way to know whether you will enjoy living and working in that country.  

 

Learn the Language

 

Second, you need to learn the language of the country you intend to work in.  It is not necessary that you be fluent, but you should be able to ask basic questions and understand basic directions.  This will not only make your life easier once you get there, but will convince any possible employers that you are serious in your desire to work for them.  

 

Internships

 

To find an internship or prospect, it is a good idea to join professional organizations related to your field.  Joining organizations and associations is a great way to make contacts, network, find job listings and open a few doors that would otherwise remain closed to you.

 

Be Flexible

 

Finally, although you may have a target country in mind or you may be looking for a career that will last a lifetime, it is important that you be flexible.  If an opportunity arises that is not where you expected to travel to, or only lasts a short time, take it.  It will still be a great way to get on track to your ultimate career goals.  

 

There are almost no guarantees in life, so by following these practices you cannot be assured that your international business degree will be put to good use.  However, not taking the time to put these tips into practice will most assuredly limit the probability of you successfully finding employment abroad.  

 

Want to Know More About Starting an International Business Career?

 

Thank you for reading our Global Career Blog. We also offer dynamic, interactive trainings that provide insights on many different global career topics. Visit our brand new training site to register for upcoming courses.

 

 

Passport Career provides more detailed career information and extensive resources about networking, finding an international job or internship, country-specific business protocol and culture, alternative career opportunities, writing country-specific resumes/CVs, cover letters and interview strategies for other countries. If your university/college, organization, company, embassy, library, or other institution would like access to our country portfolios and global career training program (50,000+ pages of expert content for 90+ countries and 275+ cities) to share with your students, employees, spouses/partners, and others managing a national or international career transition, please click here to contact us (or send email to: global@passportcareer.com) regarding a free, live, online demo and details on how to obtain a license to
access Passport Career.

 

This is a guest blog by Blake Pappas.  Blake is passionate about education and international business.  When not writing and working, Blake is busy planning his next international excursion with friends or exercising.  You can reach him at blakepappas1984@gmail.com.

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